Ventz

BRIEF

Ventz provides a simple, efficient method of ventilation for motorcyclists. In hot weather, riders often experience uncomfortably high temperatures beneath their protective leather clothing. When client Martin Warren witnessed the unzipped jacket of a fellow motorcyclist flap up, obscuring the rider’s vision, he decided there must be a better, safer way to cool riders down. He brought his idea for a wearable ventilation system to D2M, and Ventz has proved so successful that the initial number produced quickly sold out and Warren now faces the challenge of fulfilling order numbers.

PROCESS

The two component parts of the Ventz presentation prototype were made with polypropylene plastic and TPU plastic respectively. These parts did not easily assemble and dissemble, however, and it was discovered that the TPU plastic had a sure-hardness of 80 and was not malleable enough. This problem was addressed and the sure-hardness of the plastic lowered to 75 in the final manufacturing specification. It was also discovered that, when bent (as around a rider’s arm), the TPU component came away too easily from the polypropylene. This was rectified with CAD by extending the length of the plastic pads designed to hold the two components together.

Having found solutions to these problems, D2M was then able to produce a manufacturing specification, including 3D data and information on everything from materials and sure-hardness to the finish to be used for the plastic, enabling the start of production tooling.

LAUNCH

Since launching Ventz onto the market, demand has been such that Warren has found fulfilling the number of orders he is receiving to be a challenge. An initial order of 12,000 units, based on pre-orders of 8,000 from retailers and customers, quickly sold out. Warren sells Ventz directly online at a rate of around 20 per day and through UK motorcycle retailer Fowlers, and is currently discussing his product with Essex Police and European companies. In a recent interview, he spoke of interest developing even further afield: ‘There have been calls from Germany, South Africa, the U.S. and Australia, along with a skiing company who are interested in adapting the technology. It’s literally going worldwide.’

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